Weekly Lesson Plans

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Every week you will find the weekly lesson plans for English 9 on this page.  This weekly lesson plan will be changed and updated as needed and should be the first place to look for information about what is going on in our classroom. You are responsible for knowing the information on the lesson plans and meeting all due dates as posted on the lesson plans.

Semester 2

Genre Study / Magical Realism

Through the study of various fictional works and literary criticism, students explore “magical realism.” Students learn about the interconnectedness of texts over time and space as they study how authors transform source material. Students come to understand the style and characteristics of magical realism, even though many critics disagree about what exactly qualifies as “magical realism.” They also explore how literature can express “real human truth” and be used as a vehicle for social commentary. Text Use: Character and theme development, symbolism, elements and characteristics of a genre.

Whole Class Novel

The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka

RELATED TEXTS Literary Texts (Fiction) • “The Transformation of Arachne into a Spider“ from Metamorphoses, Ovid   • “The Nose,” Nikolai Gogol • “A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings,” Gabriel Garcia Marquez • “Nothing but Death,” Pablo Neruda Informational Texts (Nonfiction) • Pages 6-8 of “A Necessary Confusion: Magical Realism,” Bainard Cowan • Part 1 of “Magical Realism in the Works of Nikolai Gogol,” James D. Hardy and Nicholas Stanton • Introduction to Lecture on the Metamorphosis, Vladimir Nabokov Nonprint Texts (Fiction or Nonfiction) (e.g., Media, Video, Film, Music, Art, Graphics) • “Magical Realism Is Still Realism“ from Big Think, Salman Rushdie (Video and transcript) • Roots, Frida Kahlo

(Personalized learning plans/flipped grammar lessons)

Elements of Language

  • Grammar, Usage, Mechanics
  • Sentences and Paragraphs
  • Reading Workshops
  • Writing Workshops

CC.9-10.W.7 (10.4.4, 10.4.6. 10.5.9) — Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

ESSENTIAL QUESTION

How do writers use magical elements combined with everyday events to reveal a human truth?

Goals:

  • Students discuss the nature of truth in fiction, read “Magical Realism Is Still Realism,” and then write an objective summary.  
  • Students reread “Magical Realism Is Still Realism” and then define and establish criteria for magical realism.
  • Students read “The Transformation of Arachne into a Spider” and determine the meaning of unknown words and mythological references in context.
  • Students reread “The Transformation of Arachne into a Spider” and identify aspects of the text that demonstrate elements of magical realism.
  • Students compare and contrast the transformation of Arachne with the transformation of Pallas.
  • Students analyze Roots by Frida Kahlo as a visual depiction of magical realism.
  • Students read paragraphs 1-22 of The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka, determine the meaning of unknown words, and analyze character traits of Gregor Samsa.
  • Students read paragraphs 22-30 of The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka, determine the meaning of unknown words, and write an objective summary of Section I.
  • Students reread Section I of The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka and identify aspects of the text that demonstrate elements of magical realism.
  • Students engage in a fishbowl discussion of the character development and elements of magical realism in Section I of The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka.
  • Students read paragraphs 31-45 of The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka, determine the meaning of unknown words, and analyze character traits of Greta and Mr. Samsa.
  • Students read paragraphs 46-58 of The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka, determine the meaning of unknown words, and write an objective summary of Section II.
  • Students reread Section II of The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka and identify aspects of the text that demonstrate elements of magical realism.
  • Students read paragraphs 59-69 of The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka, determine the meaning of unknown words, and analyze characters’ changing attitudes.
  • Students read paragraphs 70-96 of The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka, determine the meaning of unknown words, and write an objective summary of Section III.
  • Students reread Section III of The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka and identify aspects of the text that demonstrate elements of magical realism.
  • Students write a timed in essay in response to one of the fishbowl discussion questions on The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka.
  • Students edit and write their final drafts to answer one of the fishbowl discussion questions on The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka.
  • Students read an excerpt from “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” by F. Scott Fitzgerald to demonstrate their ability to read, understand, and express understanding of that text.
  • Students read and analyze “Sestina” by Elizabeth Bishop in pairs using TP-CASTT.
  • Students read and analyze “Ode to Sadness ” by Pablo Neruda in pairs using TP-CASTT.
  • Students reread and analyze elements of myth and magical realism in “Sestina” by Elizabeth Bishop and “Ode to Sadness” by Pablo Neruda.
  • Students read “A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings” by Gabriel Garcia Marquez, determine the meaning of unknown words, and write an objective summary of the story.
  • Students reread “A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings” by Gabriel Garcia Marquez and identify aspects of the text that demonstrate elements of magical realism.
  • Students engage in a Socratic seminar to discuss the idea of transformation in the unit texts and how it reveals a human truth and theme.
  • Students begin the writing process to answer the prompt: How does The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka draw on and transform the myth “The Transformation of Arachne into a Spider” from Ovid’s Metamorphoses
  • Students continue the writing process by creating a first draft to answer the prompt: How does The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka draw on and transform the myth “The Transformation of Arachne into a Spider” from Ovid’s Metamorphoses
  • Students continue the writing process, revising their own writing in response to the prompt: How does The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka draw on and transform the myth “The Transformation of Arachne into a Spider” from Ovid’s Metamorphoses
  • Students edit and write their final drafts to answer the prompt: How does The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka draw on and transform the myth “The Transformation of Arachne into a Spider” from Ovid’s Metamorphoses
  • Students read an excerpt from “The Horse and the Olive” from James Baldwin’s Old Greek Stories and then determine elements of magical realism and the human truth that is revealed in order to prepare to write their own modernized version using magical realism.
  • Students brainstorm in order to prepare to write their own modernized version of the excerpt from “The Horse and the Olive” from James Baldwin’s Old Greek Stories using magical realism.
  • Students write a first draft of their own modernized version of the excerpt from “The Horse and the Olive” from James Baldwin’s Old Greek Stories using magical realism.
  • Students continue the writing process for their own modernized version of the excerpt from “The Horse and the Olive” from James Baldwin’s Old Greek Stories using magical realism.
  • Students complete the writing process for their own modernized version of the excerpt from “The Horse and the Olive” from James Baldwin’s Old Greek Stories using magical realism.
  • Students present their own modernized version of the excerpt from “The Horse and the Olive” from James Baldwin’s Old Greek Stories using magical realism.

Experiencing the five stages of the writing process

Monday May 1  

  • Using the plot diagram produced on Friday, students write a one page analysis of the strength and weaknesses of their short story from the magical realism unit.

Tuesday May 2

  • Peer Review of short story and short story analysis.

Wednesday May 3

  • Writing Workshop
  • Short Story Revisions

Thursday May 4

  • Students continue to revise the draft of their own modernized version of the excerpt from “The Horse and the Olive” from James Baldwin’s Old Greek Stories using magical realism.
  • Revised draft of modernized version of the excerpt from “The Horse and the Olive” from James Baldwin’s Old Greek Stories using magical realism due by end of class period.

Friday May 5

  • Writing Workshop
  • Short Story Edits

Edited draft of modernized version of the excerpt from “The Horse and the Olive” from James Baldwin’s Old Greek Stories using magical realism will be due by the end of class period.

Final Folder checks will take place on Wednesday May 10.

2 Comments

  1. ” It could happen to anyone ” I like it better than the other because I think it was well set up because of how she asked you questions and gave examples that you could’ve related too. The revision helps and looks a lot better
    I think revisions helped the story so you could go back over it to help the reader understand what you mean and even kind of locker the reader into it by asking questions that maybe they can/could’ve related too.
    The most revision that I thought was more effective was the one when she first started asking the reader instead of how she went about it on her draft when she started talking about how she grew up /where she did . Because the revision one kept the ready wanting to know more a than just a plain old story. I like it also because if you would have stopped reading the first papargraph it would have left still wondering what you was talking about .
    I am a good reader and student . I’m also a very good person I will help you when you need help. You have to stay focused in school and DO YOUR WORK you also do what the teacher says and if you know you have a test or quiz coming up you need to study. That you need that in life to succeed. If they do what their told and when they are told they do it. They also follow the rules.

  2. Once on a Snowy Christmas Eve I was rushed to my grandparents. I didn’t know why my parents were rushing so much like it was only 11:30 and my grandparents lived about five minutes away. At this time I was only 4 years old and my sister was 15 so she didn’t have to have my grandparents watch her. I remember my mom said we will be back to pick you up at six. I looked at my grandma and she smiled at me.

    I watched cartoons and took a nap because I was super tired. I remember I kept asking my grandma what mom and dad was doing and she would always tell me they have to go get something very special from Santa. I thought in my 4 year old head they get to meet Santa wow that’s awesome. I remember annoying my grandmother with lots of questions after she tried to change the subject a thousand times. After awhile my parents came and got me and they got me a cute little puppy

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